Research

Research Spotlight: July 2021

Thu, 07/08/2021 - 1:47pm -- maphillips

 

Assessment of the pinned specimen digitization progress of the University of Alaska Museum Insect Collection

Ashley L. Smith, Derek S. Sikes, Taylor L. Kane, Adam Haberski, Jayce B. Williamson, Renee K. Nowicki, Michael J. Apperson

University of Alaska Museum, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

This article was originally published in the Alaska Entomological Society Newsletter AKES_newsletter_2021_n1_a01.pdf (akentsoc.org)

Scientist in the Spotlight: Diego Barroso

Wed, 09/02/2020 - 4:41pm -- ablackwell
 
In our series, "Scientist in the Spotlight" we’ll sit down with the ADBC (Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections) program's best and brightest to learn more about what makes them tick.  This month, we had a chance to speak with Diego Barroso. He works at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas as the project manager of the TORCH TCN.
 

Botany Students Study Effects of Climate Change — Using 100-Year-Old Plants

Tue, 08/18/2020 - 3:11pm -- maphillips

 

What can 120-year-old flower buds neatly pressed to paper teach you about climate change? As it turns out, a lot.

Nineteen botany students had the chance to dive into more than a century of California’s plant data this spring in an exploration of the nuances plant life using computer programming and statistical analyses.

iDigBio at SPNHC 2019: Making the Case for Natural History Collections

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 11:34am -- dpaul

The SPNHC 2019 theme: Making the Case for Natural History Collections offers everyone a chance to share the value of collections for society and science. iDigBio staff look forward to contributing to this story and visiting the Field Museum who are hosting this year's SPNHC meeting.

Some of the events iDigBio is organizing or participating in include:

Research Spotlight: July 2018

Fri, 06/29/2018 - 12:18pm -- maphillips

Digital Coyote; an online archive of skulls

Contributed by: Osrica Mclean and Declan McCabe

How can you provide an authentic opportunity for undergraduate students to study geographical variation without hauling them to major metropolitan museums and arranging access to valuable specimens?  This question started a slightly obsessive odyssey that began with a single coyote skull and now stands at 125 skulls….and counting.

ICEDIG: Innovation and consolidation for large scale digitization of natural heritage

Tue, 01/09/2018 - 4:58pm -- dpaul

Imagine an ADBC-type program for the EU and related countries with their very own version of Thematic Collection Networks and an iDigBio-like hub. This very idea is coming soon with the monicker: DiSSCo -- Distributed System of Scientific Collections. How will it be structured? What human resources will be needed? What about the cyberinfrastructure? What experiences and lessons learned can iDigBio share to benefit DiSSCo?

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