News Articles

Published: 07-11-2017
Manta Rays Manta rays are some of the ocean’s gentle giants. These amazing animals are related to sharks and other rays and have a skeleton made of cartilage, instead of bone. The genus Manta, consists of two species: Manta birostris and Manta alfredi, referred to commonly as the Giant Manta and the Reef Manta Ray, respectively. They are in the family Mobulidae, along with several...
Published: 06-24-2017
From the Darwin Core Hour Team.   Hi everyone! In this blog post we present a summary of what the Darwin Core Hour is, where the initiative came from, how it works, and how you can get involved.   Why is there a need for a Darwin Core Hour? Where did the idea come from?   Have you ever thought... “How is this Darwin Core term supposed to fit given the data I have? Or...
Published: 06-23-2017
Hole-y Plant Databases! Understanding and Preventing Biases in Botanical Big Data Humans have been collecting and preserving plants across the globe for hundreds of years, and patterns drawn from aggregated specimen records can teach us many things about the natural world. For example, my thesis research focuses on how plants with different traits shift their flowering times in response to...
Published: 06-23-2017
American Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) Photo courtesy of: Florida Fish and Wildlife, Photo by: Karen Parker Although their common name suggests they are crustaceans, horseshoe crabs aren’t really crabs at all. In fact, their closest living relatives are spiders and scorpions. Today’s horseshoe crabs have many similarities to extinct trilobites and look virtually the same as...
Published: 06-02-2017
The iDigBio Education and Outreach Working Group, Biodiversity Literacy for Undergraduate Education (BLUE) Kurator, AIM-UP!, Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis (QUBES), and Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) teamed up on a workshop entitled Resources for Collections-Based Undergraduate Education at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, on May 24-25,...
Published: 06-01-2017
Data Curation Profiles—An Information Science framework for data managers -- Contributed by Wade Bishop and Kelly White, The University of Tennessee, School of Information Sciences The volume and variety of data within iDigBio is known by anyone working with biocollections. In today’s data intensive science climate, it is becoming more widely realized that in order for data to...
Published: 05-15-2017
The effective and efficient use of a digital camera is integral to one of the primary task clusters in many digitization workflows, whether the object of the image is a label, full specimen, or a composite or aggregated collection object. For most institutions, decisions about camera model; aperture, shutter speed, and ISO settings; lighting; and the type of imaging station to deploy are...
Published: 05-09-2017
Contributed by: Teresa Iturriaga, Rhianna Baldree, Alex Kuhn, Andrew Miller Mycologists long to collect areas remote to most men where fungi today may thrive keeping plants, trees, and cycles alive. Bridges are to their liking since one can go underneath connecting with what lies beneath. About fungi this is most striking. In summer some may float if the bridge is over a moat...
Published: 05-01-2017
Using specimens to create a pollinator community assessment of restored tallgrass prairie -- Contributed by Heather Cray, Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo Animal species need space – a place to forage, grow, and nest. This is especially true of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), who’s caterpillars generally feed exclusively on one genus...
Published: 04-06-2017
iDigBio staff members Bruce MacFadden, Libby Ellwood, and Molly Phillips attended the 2017 National Science Teachers Association National Meeting held on March 30-April 2 in the L.A. Convention Center in downtown Los Angeles. The conference was massive – attended by thousands of K-college science teachers from around the country and world. The NSTA 2017 conference was divided into four...

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