News Articles

Published: 11-20-2018
The biodiversity collections community produced another successful Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing Biocollections (WeDigBio) event last month. Begun in 2015, the annual four-day data creation campaign engages distributed participants online at sites such as Notes from Nature, Smithsonian Transcription Center, DigiVol, and Les herbonautes, as well as onsite visitors at the world’s...
Published: 11-18-2018
Wood-warblers, Parulidae Image Credit: Joe Poston Wood-warblers or New World warblers, often referred to as the “jewels of the forest” are sought after by birders due to their bright plumage and bold contrasting patterns. Beginning in August, fall migration allows many birders the opportunity to see these often solitary birds traveling in mixed flocks. There are over fifty...
Published: 11-13-2018
Augustus Fendler Herbarium Specimens: A Locality Improvement Project A component of the Southern Rocky Mountain Flora Database Project Lance J. Gloss and Timothy J. S. Whitfeld Brown U. Herbarium (BRU) Dec 2017 - May 2018 Introduction This project involved archival research into primary and secondary sources to improve the precision and accuracy of our records for the "...
Published: 10-19-2018
Metabolic rates, climate, and macroevolution: a case study using Neogene molluscs Luke C. Strotz, Erin E. Saupe, Julien Kimmig and Bruce S. Lieberman Article Contributed by: Jeanette Pirlo “Survival of the fittest” is an age-old maxim used to describe evolution. The phrase, which itself evolved via the writings of Herbert Spencer and Charles Darwin, does not actually...
Published: 10-12-2018
Summit 2018 group photo iDigBio hosted the 2018 Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Summit at the University of Florida Cultural Plaza in Gainesville, Florida, on October 2-3. The event brought members of 21 Thematic Collections Networks together, along with representatives from outside initiatives, to discuss the digitization of natural history collections, the status...
Published: 09-21-2018
The Family Brontotheriidae Contributed by Sean Moran (Florida Museum of Natural History) Image courtesy of Sean Moran from the Florida Museum of Natural History   The extinct brontotheres are grouped with horses, tapirs, and rhinoceroses in the mammalian order Perissodactyla, or odd-toed ungulates. Superficially reminiscent of today’s rhinos, though probably more closely...
Published: 09-17-2018
Utilising publicly available species occurrence records to generate contemporary estimates of medically important snake species distributions Contributed by: Joshua Longbottom, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine Whilst working as a research assistant within the Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group (SEEG) at the University of Oxford, I was exposed to the utility of statistical modelling to...
Published: 08-14-2018
European honey bee, Apis mellifera Image Credit: USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is one of the first domesticated insects and is the primary species kept by beekeepers worldwide. Originating in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, the European honey bee can be found today on every continent except Antarctica having been spread by humans who...
Published: 08-14-2018
From Vince Smith (NHM), Deborah Paul (iDigBio), Matt Woodburn (NHM), Sharon Grant (FM), Randy Singer (iDigBio), Kevin Love (iDigBio) Introduction. Picture a time in the future when we can look online at anytime to see how many collections are digitized, georeferenced, and published and how many have yet to digitize – planet-wide. Perhaps you want to know what is unique about your...
Published: 08-03-2018
Workshop Group Photo A workshop entitled “Drawers, Jars and Databases: Teaching the Hidden Science of Natural History Museums” was held July 9-11, 2018 in Raleigh, North Carolina. This workshop was a collaborative effort involving the National Science Foundation, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (NCMNS), Prairie Ridge Ecostation, Integrated Digitized Biocollections (...

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