News Articles

Published: 06-09-2020
  The iDigBio team is in full agreement with the recent statements made by the University of Florida, Florida State University, and Florida Museum in support of racial justice and condemning the murder of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade and countless others.   Our project feels strongly that diversity is a strength and that we all have work to do...
Published: 06-05-2020
                                                     Article by: Zoliswa Nhleko, PhD candidate at the UF School of Natural Resources and Enviroment White rhinos were formerly abundant in the Kruger National Park (KNP) till the 19th century when they were...
Published: 06-04-2020
Article by: Zoliswa Nhleko, PhD candidate at the UF School of Natural Resources and Environment There are two species of rhinos that inhabit Africa: the white rhino and black rhino. How the white rhino got its name is uncertain. There is one popular story that early dutch settlers referred to it as, wijde, Dutch for “wide,” which might have been because of their wide lip. The...
Published: 06-04-2020
The Paleo Digitization Working Group held a virtual workshop, Georeferencing for Paleo: Refreshing the approach to fossil localities, on April 28-29, 2020 with 52 participants based at 29 institutions. These participants represented a mix of institutions (museums, university collections, and agencies) as well as careers (collections professionals, researchers, informatics professionals) and...
Published: 05-04-2020
Article by: Nattapol Kraisitudomsook, PhD student from the Smith Lab at the University of Florida Despite the name, bird’s nest fungi have little to do with birds or nests. In fact, these tiny mushrooms got their common name from their resemblance to bird’s nests. You might have seen them in your backyard or come across them on your hiking trails. Bird’s...
Published: 04-24-2020
Professor and AT&T Eminent Scholar José A. B. Fortes was recently notified in a letter from University of Florida President Kent Fuchs that he is the recipient of the 2019-20 Teacher/Scholar of the Year Award, the highest faculty honor at UF. The annual award is given in recognition of excellence in teaching and distinction in scholarly activity. The award is made upon...
Published: 04-03-2020
  Many things have changed rapidly and these are unprecedented and stressful times, but one positive for our team now all working remotely are all of the new coworkers! Due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, many iDigBio-associated events are being re-designed for online participation (or postponed), so iDigBio staff are shifting focus to how we can support the community online....
Published: 03-30-2020
  Contributed by Luis D. Verde Arregoitia. Find him on Twitter @LuisDVerde or on his Website. Ecomorphological research relates what species look like with where they live, how they move, and what they eat. Therefore, we need to characterize them morphologically, and natural history collections represent the most important source of such data, which can also help us understand their...
Published: 03-24-2020
  Margay Article by: Nicholas Gengler, PhD student from UF School of Natural Resources and the Environment Early European explorers called the jungles of South America a “green desert”. Despite the abundance of plant growth, finding fruit or prey for food in the jungle can be next to impossible. The wildlife that live in these hostile environments...
Published: 02-20-2020
Photo credit: David Haring, Duke Lemur Center Aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis Lemurs are the most endangered group of mammals on earth. Endemic to Madagascar, these primates evolved in isolation from monkeys and apes. Lemurs are highly diverse, divided into eight families consisting of 15 living genera and about 100 living species. Madagascar is one of the poorest countries...

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