News Articles

Published: 10-12-2018
Summit 2018 group photo iDigBio hosted the 2018 Advancing Digitization for Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Summit at the University of Florida Cultural Plaza in Gainesville, Florida, on October 2-3. The event brought members of 21 Thematic Collections Networks together, along with representatives from outside initiatives, to discuss the digitization of natural history collections, the status...
Published: 09-21-2018
The Family Brontotheriidae Contributed by Sean Moran (Florida Museum of Natural History) Image courtesy of Sean Moran from the Florida Museum of Natural History   The extinct brontotheres are grouped with horses, tapirs, and rhinoceroses in the mammalian order Perissodactyla, or odd-toed ungulates. Superficially reminiscent of today’s rhinos, though probably more closely...
Published: 09-17-2018
Utilising publicly available species occurrence records to generate contemporary estimates of medically important snake species distributions Contributed by: Joshua Longbottom, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine Whilst working as a research assistant within the Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group (SEEG) at the University of Oxford, I was exposed to the utility of statistical modelling to...
Published: 08-14-2018
European honey bee, Apis mellifera Image Credit: USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is one of the first domesticated insects and is the primary species kept by beekeepers worldwide. Originating in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, the European honey bee can be found today on every continent except Antarctica having been spread by humans who...
Published: 08-14-2018
From Vince Smith (NHM), Deborah Paul (iDigBio), Matt Woodburn (NHM), Sharon Grant (FM), Randy Singer (iDigBio), Kevin Love (iDigBio) Introduction. Picture a time in the future when we can look online at anytime to see how many collections are digitized, georeferenced, and published and how many have yet to digitize – planet-wide. Perhaps you want to know what is unique about your...
Published: 08-03-2018
Workshop Group Photo A workshop entitled “Drawers, Jars and Databases: Teaching the Hidden Science of Natural History Museums” was held July 9-11, 2018 in Raleigh, North Carolina. This workshop was a collaborative effort involving the National Science Foundation, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (NCMNS), Prairie Ridge Ecostation, Integrated Digitized Biocollections (...
Published: 07-25-2018
Contributed by: Timothy J. Baroni & Andrew N. Miller State University of New York, Cortland, NY and University of Illinois, Champaign, IL Chlorophyllum molybdites (Image courtesy of Roy Halling) Dr. Tim Baroni, a professor of mycology at SUNY Cortland, received an email request to identify a possible poisonous mushroom from the Upstate New York Poison Center in Syracuse, New...
Published: 07-18-2018
Rattails and Grenadiers (Family Macrouridae) Images courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Contributed by Randy Singer When scientists explore the sea floor with remote operated vehicles (ROVs), seeing deep-sea fishes is always an uncommon treat. The most commonly observed deep-sea fishes are grenadiers or rattail fishes, which are in the family Macrouridae. These fishes get their name...
Published: 06-29-2018
Digital Coyote; an online archive of skulls Contributed by: Osrica Mclean and Declan McCabe How can you provide an authentic opportunity for undergraduate students to study geographical variation without hauling them to major metropolitan museums and arranging access to valuable specimens?  This question started a slightly obsessive odyssey that began with a single coyote skull and now...
Published: 06-08-2018
The Microfungi Collection Consortium represents an integrated collaborative partnership in the National Science Foundation supported Thematic Collections Network to increase the accessibility of digitized collection information for educational and scientific use. Educational outreach programs provide an important link to foster communication and interaction between scientists and society....

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