Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference, Berkeley

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Conference Reports

Lodging and Logistics

For those seeking economy, we have secured a package deal at very low cost that includes 3 nights in a dorm-style room, shared bathroom, and 3 meals/day.
These rooms are in Unit 1 Residence Hall, 2650 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94720, located 1 block from campus, near many restaurants and shops,
a short 8 minute walk to the venue, and 10 blocks from BART.
Check in is Sunday June 3rd after 3pm.
Check out is Wednesday June 6th by 11:00 am.
For students: Single occupancy rate (including conference registration) is $308.73. Double occupancy rate (per person, including conference registration) is $239.10.
For non-students: Single occupancy rate (including conference registration) is $361.48. Double occupancy rate (per person, including conference registration) is $291.85.
Since these economy rates are a package deal, the check in and out dates are firm and cannot be changed on an individual basis.

Social Media

Twitter: #digidata, @idigbio

Traveling to Berkeley from SFO or OAK

Information for Traveling to Berkeley

Food and Restaurant Options

Restaurant options near campus

Conference Registration

Registration opens 16 January 2018 and will be handled by Eventbrite.

PLEASE REGISTER EARLY. WE HAVE LIMITED CAPACITY AND MAY BE REQUIRED TO CLOSE REGISTRATION EARLY IF THE CONFERENCE FILLS UP.

Registration fees Registration fees include the conference, workshops, and refreshments and hors d'oeuvres at Monday's poster session and Tuesday's reception:

  • $100.00 for professionals,
  • $ 50.00 for students.

General registration deadline: 15 May 2018.

  • Registration deadline for those submitting an abstract: 30 April 2018.
  • Registration deadline for those taking advantage of the economy lodging option: 15 May 2018

To register: Click here

Conference Abstracts

This year we offered attendees an opportunity to propose oral and poster presentations as well as to propose and lead an open discussion session about a critical topic in the research use of digital data. Each of these required an abstract submission. Each abstract was tied to one of the five conference themes:
Addressing the fundamental questions of evolutionary biology and ecology,
Meeting the research challenges of the Anthropocene,
Biodiversity data archives for education and science outreach,
New tools for data discovery and analysis,
Future, untested frontiers for natural history collections.
Submitted abstracts can be found by clicking the following links:

Poster Specifications

Poster Specifications: Posters should not exceed 3’ tall and 4’ feet wide and should be displayed in landscape orientation.

Campus Maps

Printable Campus Map
Interactive Google Map

Conference Streaming and Recording

To the extent possible, the Conference sessions will be broadcast and recorded using Adobe Connect. Meeting hosts will monitor the chat to address questions/concerns. To connect, go to https://idigbio.adobeconnect.com/digitaldataberkeley, select “Enter as a Guest”, enter your first name and surname and click “Enter Room.” For more information, remote participants are strongly encouraged to visit the iDigBio Web Conferencing Wiki prior to connecting: https://www.idigbio.org/wiki/index.php/Web_Conferencing.


Preconference Invited Workshop

Sunday, 3 June 2018

Pre-conference Invited Workshops and Meetings
Breakfast (On your own) 7:30 - 8:30 a.m.
VLSB 2063 - Valley Life Sciences Building - 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education: A Workshop to define competencies for the core undergraduate biology curriculum
Moderator: Anna Monfils


The NSF funded RCN-UBE Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education - Data Initiative (BLUE Data) is working to bring together communities of biodiversity, data, and education specialists to identify core biodiversity data competencies for undergraduates, develop strategies for integrating these competencies into the introductory biology curriculum, and build capacity for sustained development and implementation of biodiversity and data literacy education. This is the first of several invited workshops to generate community consensus on a core set of biodiversity data literacy skills. The goal of this specific meeting is to review the current landscape of data literacy competencies from k-12 to graduate education in biodiversity data science, identify gaps in student learning related to data and biodiversity science core skills, and begin to generate community consensus on defined biodiversity data literacy competencies. Results from this workshop will inform efforts to develop competencies, materials, and strategies designed to facilitate broad-scale adoption of transferrable data literacy competencies that can improve undergraduate biology training and meet increasing workforce demands in both data and biodiversity sciences.

Fishbowl UCMP - Valley Life Sciences Building - 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
2018 Regional Meeting of GBIF Participant Nodes in North America
Moderator: David Jennings


This is an invited meeting of node managers. The 2018 Regional Meeting of GBIF Participant Nodes in North America​ is being hosted by iDigBio in conjunction with the Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference. The North America Regional Nodes meeting brings together representatives from the GBIF nodes in the North America region to inspire collaboration and discussion of shared goals, challenges, and opportunities. The meeting will focus on progress updates from the represented nodes, preparations for the Governing Board meeting, and a discussion of strategies/goals for the coming year.​ Visit the following page for more information, including the agenda: https://www.gbif.org/event/7f0hFJBXsAUaMaquAumOIM/north-american-nodes-meeting

Agenda

Monday, 4 June 2018

Day One
7:30 - 8:30 a.m. - Breakfast (On your own)
7:30 - 8:30 a.m. - Registration: Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center
Keynote Session
Sibley Auditorium - Bechtel Engineering Center
8:00 - 11:20 a.m.
Moderator: David Ackerly
Timekeeper: Molly Phillips
Time  Title Presenter(s)
8:30-9:00 Welcome
Introduction to iDigBio and ADBC
Workshop Framing
Gil Nelson, iDigBio, Florida State University

David Ackerly, Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley

9:00-9:30 The advent of digital technology and its promise for biodiversity research James Hanken, Director, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
9:30-10:00 3D phenotypes for all David C. Blackburn, Associate Curator of Herpetology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
10:00-10:30 Break - Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center
10:30-11:00 Phenotyped Paula M. Mabee, Professor of Biology, University of South Dakota, formerly Director of the Division of Environmental Biology in the NSF’s Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO)
11:00-11:20 Biodiversity data and cloud-based analysis tools: A survey of the present and a squint into the future David Thau, Manager of Developer Relations for Google Earth Engine and Google Earth Outreach
Concurrent Session I-A - Classroom 240, Bechtel Engineering Center - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Moderator: Pam Soltis
Timekeeper: Patrick Sweeney

Theme: Addressing the fundamental questions of evolutionary biology and ecology
11:30-11:45 What drives European fungal biogeography? Connecting digital data to temporally static and dynamic environmental predictors to explain climate, pollution and urbanization impacts on fungi Carrie Andrew, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL Birmensdorf, Switzerland; University of Oslo, Norway
Ulf Büntgen, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland; Global Change Res. Centre & Masaryk Univ., Czech Republic; Simon Egli, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland; Einar Heegaard, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Fana, Norway; Rune Halvorsen, Natural History Museum, Univ. of Oslo, Norway; Paul M Kirk, Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, United Kingdom; Klaus Høiland, University of Oslo, Norway; Claus Bässl; Bavarian Forest National Park, Grafenau, Germany; Tech. Univ. of Munich, Freising, Germany; Alan C Gange, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom; Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Natural History Museum, Univ. of Copenhagen, Denmark; Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, University of Vienna, Austria; Thomas W Kuyper, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Beatrice Senn-Irlet, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland; Lynne Boddy, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University; Håvard Kauserud, University of Oslo, Norway
11:45-12:00 Using herbarium records to make climate niche comparisons among co-occurring sub-dominant forbs of the sagebrush steppe Sarah Barga, University of Nevada, Reno
Tom Dilts, University of Nevada, Reno; Elizabeth Leger, University of Nevada, Reno
12:00-12:15 Ontology of Ecological Affordances: What, Why and How Steve Dilliplane, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
12:15-12:30 Sensors for Monitoring Feeding Behavior in Nectar-feeding Bats P. Bryan Heidorn, University of Arizona
Concurrent Session I-B - Banatao Room 250, Sutardja Dai Hall - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Moderator: Matt Collins
Timekeeper: Nelson Rios

Theme: New tools for data discovery and analysis
11:30-11:45 MorphoBank at twenty years: the importance of discipline-specific repositories Mariangeles Arce H.,The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
Maureen A. O'Leary, Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA
11:45-12:00 Biodiversity and Taxonomy Software Tools in R Scott Chamberlain, rOpenSci/University of California, Berkeley
12:00-12:15 Reconciling phenological observations with flowering records in herbaria Jonathan Davies, University of British Columbia
Will Pearse, Utah State University
12:15-12:30 Assembling global scale plant phenology observation data John Deck, Berkeley Natural History Museums, University of California, Berkeley
Kjell Bolmgren, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Ellen Denny, USA National Phenology Network; Brian Stucky, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida; Ramona Walls, CyVerse, University of Arizona; Robert Guralnick, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Concurrent Session I-C - Room 290, Hearst Memorial Mining Building - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Moderator: David Ackerly
Timekeeper: David Jennings

Theme: Meeting the research challenges of the Anthropocene
11:30-11:45 Generating databases of three-dimensional leaf structure for living collections of grapevine Elisabeth Forrestel, University of California, Davis
M. Andrew Walker, University of California, Davis; Mason Earles, Yale University; Matthew Jenkins, University of California, Davis; Andrew McElrone, University of California, Davis
11:45-12:00 Lessons from both sides: challenges in providing and using data from specimens to study the distribution of a venomous lizard in New Mexico J. Tomasz Giermakowski, The University of New Mexico
Mason J. Ryan, Arizona Game and Fish Department; Ian M. Latella, Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico
12:00-12:15 Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation: tracking the invaders Gerald "Stinger" Guala
USGS
12:15-12:30 Future priorities for conserving the evolutionary diversity of the California flora Matthew Kling, UC Berkeley
Brent Mishler, UC Berkeley; Andrew Thornhill, UC Berkeley; Bruce Baldwin, UC Berkeley; David Ackerly, UC Berkeley
Concurrent I-D - Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Moderator/timekeeper: Deb Paul

Biodiversity data archives for education and science outreach

11:30-11:45 45 Minute Discussion Session: Creating a Data Carpentry Biodiversity Curriculum François Michonneau, The Carpentries
Deb Paul, iDigBio
11:45-12:00 Data Carpentry Biodiversity Curriculum, cont'd François Michonneau, The Carpentries
Deb Paul, iDigBio
12:00-12:15 Data Carpentry Biodiversity Curriculum, cont'd François Michonneau, The Carpentries
Deb Paul, iDigBio
12:15-12:30 WeDigFLPlants—Innovative, place-based citizen science engagement to deepen public understanding of biodiversity data archives Austin Mast, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Greg Riccardi, College of Communication & Information, Florida State University, Robert Bruhn, College of Communication & Information, Florida State University, Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits & Museum, Jillian Goodwin, College of Communication & Information, Florida State University
12:30-1:45 Lunch (On your own) - Restaurant suggestions
Concurrent II-A - Classroom 240, Bechtel Engineering Center - 1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Moderators/Timekeepers: Erica Krimmel and Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi

Theme: Addressing the fundamental questions of evolutionary biology and ecology
1:45-2:00 Clams in the City and Snails Lost at Sea: A Fitness-For-Use Assessment of Aggregated Marine Biodiversity Data Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
2:00-2:15 The Importance of Taxonomic Quality Control in Paleontological Digitization: Strategies for Increasing Fitness for Use and Trust in Aggregated Data Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Erica Krimmel, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Jann Vendetti, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Walker Lindsay, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
2:15-2:30 Learning from each other: Important lessons from discussions with biodiversity data users and creators about what, when, and where Deborah Paul, iDigBio
Katja Seltmann, Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration; Sara Lafia, University of California; Shelley James, Royal Botanic Garden Sydney; David Bloom, Florida Museum of Natural History; Nelson Rios, Yale University; Shari Ellis, Florida Museum of Natural History; Una Farrell, Stanford University; Jessica Utrup, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History; Michael Yost, New York Botanic Garden; Edward Davis, University of Oregon; Rob Emery, Department of Food and Agriculture Western Australia; Gary Motz, Indiana Geological and Water Survey; Julien Kimmig, University of Kansas; Vaughn Shirey, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University; Emily Sandall, Frost Entomological Museum at Penn State; Daniel Park, Harvard University; Christopher Tyrrell, Milwaukee Public Museum; R. Sean Thackurdeen, New York Botanic Garden; Matthew Collins, University of Florida; Vincent O'Leary, Drexel University; Heather Prestridge, Texas A & M University; Christopher Evelyn, University of California Santa Barbara; Ben Nyberg, National Tropical Botanic Garden Kalaheo
2:30-2:45 45-minutes Discussion: Increasing the Research-Readiness of Biodiversity Collections Data Erica Krimmel, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Deborah Paul, Florida State University/iDigBio, Tallahassee
2:45-3:00 Increasing Research-Readiness, cont'd Erica Krimmel, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Deborah Paul, Florida State University/iDigBio, Tallahassee
3:00-3:15 Increasing Research-Readiness, cont'd Erica Krimmel, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Deborah Paul, Florida State University/iDigBio, Tallahassee
Concurrent II-B - Banatao Room 250, Sutardja Dai Hall - 1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Moderator/Timekeeper: Matt Collins

Theme: New tools for data discovery and analysis
1:45-2:00 Elton and Nomer: two frugal tools to mobilize biodiversity data Jorrit Poelen, Global Biotic Interactions
2:00-2:15 45-minute discussion: Mobilizing biodiversity data using frugal tools Jorrit Poelen, Global Biotic Interactions
2:15-2:30 Frugal tools, cont'd Jorrit Poelen, Global Biotic Interactions
2:30-2:45 Frugal tools, cont'd Jorrit Poelen, Global Biotic Interactions
2:45-3:00 Physcraper: automatic updating of phylogenies Martha Kandziora, UC Merced
Emily Jane McTavish, UC Merced
3:00-3:15 Spatial phylogenetics of the native California flora: integrating ecology, evolution, and conservation Brent Mishler, University of California, Berkeley
Matthew Kling, University of California, Berkeley; Bruce Baldwin, University of California, Berkeley; David Ackerly, University of California, Berkeley; Andrew Thornhill, University of California, Berkeley
Concurrent II-C - Room 290, Hearst Memorial Mining Building - 1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Moderator: Randy Singer
Timekeeper: Shari Ellis

Theme: Meeting the research challenges of the Anthropocene
1:45-2:00 Using iNaturalist citizen science data to explore community assembly patterns of urban biodiversity Misha Leong, California Academy of Sciences
2:00-2:15 Just how accurate are citizen-science species identifications? Scott Loarie, iNaturalist
2:15-2:30 A state of knowledge for marine invertebrate biodiversity in the continental US François Michonneau, The Carpentries
Gustav Paulay, Florida Museum of Natural History; Mark Q. Martindale, Whitney Laboratory, University of Florida
2:30-2:45 We have all the data, now what? The importance of planning for biodiversity data integration Giovanni Rapacciuolo, University of California, Merced
Michael Beman, University of California Merced; Jessica Blois, University of California Merced; Tess Clinkingbeard, University of Washington; Simon Haberle, Australian National University; Julian Sachs, University of Washington; Lauren Schiebelhut, University of California Merced; Coral Reef Research Foundation, PALAU; Michael Dawson, University of California Merced
2:45-3:00 How open access digital data helps the Center for Biological Diversity fight for species and habitat protection Tiffany Yap, Center for Biological Diversity
3:00-3:15 Where do we go from here? The future of collections use, attribution and communications in a digital age through the lens of a data aggregator Randy Singer, Florida Museum of Natural History/iDigBio
Kevin Love, iDigbio; Larry Page, Florida Museum of Natural History/iDigBio
Concurrent II-D - Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center - 1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Moderator: Greg Riccardi
Timekeeper: Ed Gilbert

Theme: Biodiversity data archives for education and science outreach
1:45-2:00 45-minute Discussion session: Designing the WeDigBio 2018 Event to Continue Deepening Public Understanding of Biodiversity Data Archives and Research Austin Mast, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Libby Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits & Museum
Kevin Love, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
2:00-2:15 Designing the WeDigBio 2018 Event, cont'd Austin Mast, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Libby Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits & Museum; Kevin Love, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
2:15-2:30 Designing the WeDigBio 2018 Event, cont'd Austin Mast, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Libby Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits & Museum; Kevin Love, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
2:30-2:45 Anfibios del Ecuador: a large and multilayered digital encyclopedia on Ecuadorian amphibians Santiago Ron, Museo de Zoología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
Andrés Merino-Viteri, Museo de Zoología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Quito, Ecuador; Diego A. Ortiz, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia; Mario Yánez-Muñoz, 3Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Quito, Ecuador
2:45-3:00 AmphibiaWeb Innovations to Address the Global Crisis in Amphibians Michelle Koo, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley
David C. Blackburn, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida; David C. Cannatella, Dept. of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin; Alessandro Catenazzi, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Florida International University; Ann T. Chang , Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley; Joyce Gross, Berkeley Natural History Museum, UC Berkeley; Philip Kahn, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley; Deanna H. Olson, US Forest Service, Corvallis, Oregon; Carol Spencer, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley; Vance T. Vredenburg, Dept. of Biology, San Francisco State University; David B. Wake, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley
3:00-3:15 SEINet: The History and Future of Mobilizing Natural History Collections through a Bio-Collaborative Portal Network Edward Gilbert, Arizona State University
Nico Franz, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, Arizona; Gil Nelson, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
3:15-3:45 Break - Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center

Poster Session

Poster Session - Moore Lobby - Hearst Memorial Mining Building - 3:45 - 5:30 p.m.
A comparison of hull methods for estimating species ranges and richness maps: An empirical evaluation using tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae) Lucia Lohmann, Departamento de Botânica, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil & University of California, Berkeley
Leila Meyer, Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil; José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho, Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil
Morphological Convergence in Anuran Limbs Natasha Stepanova, University of California, Berkeley
Molly Womack, UC Berkeley
Phylogenetic endemism of Neotropical amphibians, birds, and mammals in the Dry-Diagonal (Cerrado, Caatinga, and Chaco) João Tonini, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
Cristina Miyaki, Laboratório de Genética e Evolução Molecular de Aves, Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; Naomi Pierce, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University; Scott Edwards, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
pegax: Fast Taxonomic Name Parsing in R Scott Chamberlain, rOpenSci / UC Berkeley
Resolving “orphaned” parts in taxonomic descriptions by using machine learning and natural language processing methods Steven Chong, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
Dongfang Xu, University of Arizona; Thomas Rodenhausen, University of Arizona; Hong Cui, University of Arizona
New tools for data literacy and data management skills for undergraduate research Paul Foster, Bijagual Ecological Reserve and University of Michigan
Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University; Gillian Bowser, Colorado State University; Ulrike Gretzel, University of Southern California; Diane White Husic, School of Natural and Health Sciences Moravian College; Teresa Mourad, Ecological Society of America; John Moore, Colorado State University;
NEON Biorepository: Access NEON samples and specimens from across the US Megan A. Jones, National Ecological Observatory Network - Battelle; Katherine M. Thibault, National Ecological Observatory Network - Battelle
Open source tools and workflows for repository management at the Arctic Data Center Irene Steves, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), UCSB
Jesse Goldstein, NCEAS; Matt Jones, NCEAS; the Arctic Data Center Team
Revitalizing the Cretaceous Seas of California through Comprehensive Collections Digitization Lindsay Walker, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Austin Hendy, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Erica Krimmel, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Jann Vendetti, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Leveraging Herbarium Data to Maximize Conservation Value of Seed Collections in Baja California Katherine Heineman, San Diego Zoo Global
Joyce Maschinski, San Diego Zoo Global; Jon Rebman; San Diego Natural History Museum; Sula Vanderplank, San Diego Natural History Museum
What’s new in the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL)? Constance Rinaldo, Ernst Mayr Library and Archives of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
Assessing risks of outbreaks of disease vectors through Bayesian analysis of museum specimen data Adam Zeilinger, University of California, Berkeley
Giovanni Rapacciuolo, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of California Merced; Daniel Turek, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Williams College; Pete Oboyski, Essig Museum of Entomology, University of California Berkeley; Rodrigo P. P. Almeida, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California Berkeley; George Roderick, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California Berkeley
Using digitized herbarium specimens in the classroom to investigate biogeographic concepts and climate change Christopher Kopp, University of British Columbia
Diving into the deep end: Teaching upper level ecology and evolution using digitized natural history collections Janice Krumm, Widener University
Jean L. Woods, Delaware Museum of Natural History; Elizabeth K. Shea, Delaware Museum of Natural History
Engaging K-12 Audiences with Biodiversity Data through Advancing Digitization for Biodiversity Collections Molly Phillips, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Anne Basham Founder/CEO ExplorMor, a nonprofit organization in affliation with Arizona State University, Tempe; Marc Cubeta, North Carolina University; Kari Harris, Arkansas State University; Jonathan Hendricks, San Jose University; Gabriela Hogue, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences; Talia Karim, CU Museum of Natural History, Boulder; Lisa White UC Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley
Swimming in the deep end: Designing and completing one-semester original research projects using digitized natural history collections Elizabeth K. Shea, Delaware Museum of Natural History
Jean Woods, Delaware Museum of Natural History; Imrin Goraya, Widener University; Theresa Tran, Widener University; Katelyn Mecouch, Widener University; Evan Perkowski, Widener University; Janice Krumm, Widener University
Six million European fungal species observations to address global change questions in conservation Carrie Andrew, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland and University of Oslo, Norway
Ulf Büntgen, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom and Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland, and Global Change Res. Centre & Masaryk Univ., Czech Republic; Simon Egli, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland; Einar Heegaard, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Fana, Norway; Rune Halvorsen, Natural History Museum, Univ. of Oslo, Norway; Paul M Kirk, Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, United Kingdom; Klaus Høiland, University of Oslo, Norway; Claus Bässler, Bavarian Forest National Park, Grafenau, Germany and Tech. Univ. of Munich, Freising, Germany; Jeffrey Diez, University of California, Riverside, USA; Alan C Gange, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom; Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Natural History Museum, Univ. of Copenhagen, Denmark; Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, University of Vienna, Austria; Thomas W Kuyper, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Jenni Nordén, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway Fredrik Rustøen, University of
Elephants and the blind Watchmakers: A biodiversity informatics parable Steve Dilliplane, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
Combining non-invasive DNA extraction techniques with Next-Generation Sequencing to create a reference library of oak gallwasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in California based on museum specimens Julian I. Rasco, University of California, Berkeley
Jeremy C. Andersen; Rosemary Gillespie; Nicholas J. Mills; Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California Berkeley
Trait data from natural history collections: Challenges & opportunities Katja S. Shulz, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History
Jennifer Hammock, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History
Partnering with the Beaty Biodiversity Museum to enhance learning experiences for first-year students in the University of British Columbia’s Biology Program Bridgette Clarkston, University of British Columbia
Linda Jennings, Beaty Biodiversity Museum, University of British Columbia
JACQ – a botanical collection management system Heimo Rainer, Natural History Museum, Vienna, Austria
Applications of ontology-based knowledge representation for comparative biology Wasila Dahdul, University of South Dakota
James Balhoff, RENCI; Hilmar Lapp, Duke University; Josef Uyeda, Virginia Tech; Todd Vision, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Paula Mabee, University of South Dakota
Named Entity Recognition on Transcribed Field Notes Rosa Lin, Tolstoy.ai
Prerna Kashyap, Tolstoy.ai
5:30 p.m. - Dinner (On your own)

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

Day Two
7:30 - 8:30 a.m. - Breakfast (On your own)
7:30 - 8:30 a.m. - Registration: Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center
Plenary Session
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
8:30 - 10:00 a.m.
Moderator: Larry Page
Timekeeper: Gil Nelson
Time Title Presenter(s)
8:30-9:00 Technological Innovation from Museums: Opportunities and Challenges to Bio-inspired Design Robert J. Full, Professor, Dept. of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley
9:00-9:30 Linking genomes, traits and environment across time and space: a vision for Digitization 2.0 Scott V. Edwards, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, and Curator of Ornithology and Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology
9:30-10:00 Deciphering evolutionary legacies on ecosystem function through remote sensing: implications for global change Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Professor, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Institute on Environment Fellow, University of Minnesota
10:00-10:30 Break - Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center
Concurrent III-A - Classroom 240, Bechtel Engineering Center - 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Moderator: Katelin Pearson
Timekeeper: Carla Cicero

Theme: New tools for data discovery and analysis
10:30-10:45 Rapid enhancement of biodiversity occurrence records using unconventional specimen data Katelin Pearson, Florida State University
10:45-11:00 Categorizing endemic and introduced species using DNA sequence signatures Peter Oboyski, Essig Museum, University of California, Berkeley
Jeremy Andersen, University of California Berkeley
11:00-11:15 Automated identification of insect vectors of Chagas disease in Brazil and Mexico Ali Khalighifar, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas
A. Townsend Peterson, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas; Edward Komp, Information & Telecommunication Technology Center, University of Kansas
11:15-11:30 GigaPanning for Golden mantled ground squirrels Andrew Doll, Denver Museum of Nature & Science
Jeff Stephenson, DMNS; Garth Spellman, DMNS; John Demboski, DMNS
11:30-11:45 Improving provenance data in natural history collection databases Gary Rosenberg, Academy of Natural Sciences, Drexel University
11:45-12: Shifting gears: the challenges of moving Canadensys to a new platform Carole Sinou, Canadensys - Université de Montréal
Jérémy Goimard, Canadensys; Anne Bruneau, Université de Montréal
12:00-12:15 Tree Cover and climate impacts on North American Megachilidae biodiversity Lindsie McCabe, Northern Arizona University
Paige Chesshire, Northern Arizona University; Neil Cobb, Northern Arizona University
Concurrent Session III-B - Banatao Room 250, Sutardja Dai Hall - 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Moderator: Brent Mishler
Timekeeper: Randy Singer
Theme: Future, untested frontiers for natural history collections
10:30-10:45 Assessing the Value of Biodiversity Collections in Conservation Research Hank Bart, Tulane University
Michael Cyrana, Tulane University
10:45-11:00 Piecewise Regression Analysis of Herbarium Specimens: Finding a Breakpoint for the Botanist Effect Justin Williams, Sam Houston State University
11:00-11:15 The Specify Collections Consortium James Beach, Specify Collections Consortium; University of Kansas
11:15-11:30 JACQ – a botanical collection management system Heimo Rainer, Natural History Museum, Vienna, Austria
Wolfgang Koller, Natural History Museum; Barbara Knickmann, Natural History Museum, , Vienna, Austria; Michael Knaack, Natural History Museum, Vienna, Austria; Tom Myers,Natural History Museum, Vienna, Austria
11:30-11:45 45 minute discussion: Harnessing Biodiversity Collections Data for Addressing National Challenges Barbara Thiers, New York Botanical Garden
Anna K. Monfils, Central Michigan University
11:45-12:00 Harnessing Biodiversity Collections Data, cont'd Barbara Thiers, New York Botanical Garden
Anna K. Monfils, Central Michigan University
12:00-12:15 Harnessing Biodiversity Collections Data, cont'd Barbara Thiers, New York Botanical Garden
Anna K. Monfils, Central Michigan University
Concurrent III-C - Room 290, Hearst Memorial Mining Building - 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Moderator/timekeeper: Molly Phillips
Theme: Meeting the research challenges of the Anthropocene
10:30-10:45 60-minute discussion: Using trait data to support biodiversity research
Session agenda
Presenters
Paula Mabee
Rachael Gallagher
Jennifer Hammock
Pam Soltis
Craig Moritz
Jorrit Poelen
John La Salle, Atlas of Living Australia/CSIRO
Robina Sanderson, Atlas of Living Australia; Hamish Holewa, Atlas of Living Australia
10:45-11:00 Trait Data, cont'd John La Salle, Atlas of Living Australia/CSIRO
Robina Sanderson, Atlas of Living Australia; Hamish Holewa, Atlas of Living Australia
11:00-11:15 Trait Data, cont'd John La Salle, Atlas of Living Australia/CSIRO
Robina Sanderson, Atlas of Living Australia; Hamish Holewa, Atlas of Living Australia
11:15-11:30 Trait Data, cont'd John La Salle, Atlas of Living Australia/CSIRO
Robina Sanderson, Atlas of Living Australia; Hamish Holewa, Atlas of Living Australia
11:30-11:45 45-minute discussion: Frontiers of Biodiversity Data Science: What can/can't we learn from Natural History Collections Data? Steve Dilliplane, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
11:45-12:00 Frontiers of Biodiversity Data Science, cont'd Steve Dilliplane, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
12:00-12:15 Frontiers of Biodiversity Data Science, cont'd Steve Dilliplane, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
Concurrent III-D - Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center - 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Moderator: Austin Mast
Timekeeper: Carol Spencer
Theme: Biodiversity data archives for education and science outreach
10:30-10:45 BIOWEB Ecuador, a portal to the biodiversity of a megadiverse country Omar Torres-Carvajal, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
Santiago Ron, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador; Jorge Orozco, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
10:45-11:00 The Madrean Discovery Expeditions Database: Documenting Sky Island Biodiversity Thomas Van Devender, GreaterGood.org, Tucson, Arizona
Edward Gilbert, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences
11:00-11:15 Expanding floristic resources to a generalist audience Linda K. Hardison, OregonFlora, Oregon State University
11:15-11:30 Fieldguide: Building Communities through Image Recognition AI Lindsie McCabe, Northern Arizona University
Andre Poremski, Fieldguide; Taylan Pince, Fieldguide; Fergal Walsh, Fieldguide; and Neil S. Cobb, Northern Arizona University
11:30-11:45 Tracking the Art – How to use Digitization to Record Artistic Use of a Vertebrate Museum Elizabeth Wommack, University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates
Bailey Russel, University of Wyoming
11:45-12:00 Networking Field Stations, Reserves and Natural History Collections: An outdoor digital partnership in the age of big data Becca Fenwick, University of California Natural Reserve System
David Ackerly, UCB; Collin Bode, UCB; Kevin Browne, UCR; Peggy Fiedler, UCOP; Michelle Koo, UCB; Scott Smith, UCB
12:00-12:15 Longterm Biodiversity Partners in Informatics: Natural History Museums and Reserves Michelle Koo, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley
David Ackerly, UC Berkeley; Heather Constable, UC Berkeley; John Deck, Berkeley Natural History Museums, UC Berkeley; Becca Fenwick, UC Natural Reserve System; Rosemary Gillespie, UC Berkeley; Joyce Gross, Berkeley Natural History Museums, UC Berkeley; Charles Marshall, Museum of Paleontology, UC Berkeley
12:15-1:30 Lunch (On your own) - Restaurant suggestions
Concurrent IV-A - Classroom 240, Bechtel Engineering Center - 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Moderators/Timekeepers: Susan Butts and Talia Karim

Theme: New tools for data discovery and analysis
1:30-1:45 JACQ – multiple taxonomies and classifications over time: dynamics and manifestations in physical specimen and digital data curation Heimo Rainer, Natural History Museum, Austria
Wolfgang Koller, Barbara Knickmann, Michael Knaack
1:45-2:00 ePANDDA: linking the Paleobiology Database, iDigBio, and iDigPaleo for biological and paleontological research, collections management, and outreach Jocelyn Sessa, Academy of Natural Sciences, Drexel University
Susan H. Butts, Yale Peabody Museum; Talia Karim, Museum of Natural History at University of Colorado Boulder; Gil Nelson, Florida State University; Christopher A. Norris, Yale Peabody Museum; Danielle Serratos, Museum of Geology South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Dena Smith, Museum of Natural History at University of Colorado Boul
2:00-2:15 60-minute discussion:
Community Data Standards: A Paleo Discussion
ePANDDA - Seth Kaufman
Talia Karim University of Colorado
Susan Butts, Yale University Peabody Museum; Holly Little, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Seth Kaufman, Whirl-i-gig
2:15-2:30 Paleo Data Standards, cont'd Talia Karim University of Colorado
Susan Butts, Yale University Peabody Museum; Holly Little, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Seth Kaufman, Whirl-i-gig
2:30-2:45 Paleo Data Standards, cont'd Talia Karim University of Colorado
Susan Butts, Yale University Peabody Museum; Holly Little, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Seth Kaufman, Whirl-i-gig
2:45-3:00 Paleo Data Standards, cont'd Talia Karim University of Colorado
Susan Butts, Yale University Peabody Museum; Holly Little, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Seth Kaufman, Whirl-i-gig
Concurrent IV-B - Banatao Room 250, Sutardja Dai Hall - 1:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Moderator: Katelin Pearson
Timekeeper: Shari Ellis
Theme: Addressing the fundamental questions of evolutionary biology and ecology
1:30-1:45 45-minute Discussion Session: Taxon concepts solve a major problem for biodiversity informatics; so why don’t we use them? Campbell Webb, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
1:45-2:00 Taxon Concepts, cont'd Campbell Webb, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
2:00-2:15 Taxon Concepts, cont'd Campbell Webb, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
2:15-2:30 Flowering phenology response to climate warming in the Pacific Northwest Christopher W. Kopp, University of British Columbia
Barbara Neto-Bradley, University of British Columbia; Linda Jennings, University of British Columbia; Jas Sandhar, University of British Columbia; Siena Smith, University of British Columbia
2:30-2:45 Studying Southern Appalachian, high-elevation rock outcrop island dynamics and species distributional patterns using digitized herbarium data Katherine Mathews, Western Carolina University
2:45-3:00 From climate change to Bergmann’s Rule: using physical and digital beetle collections to understand large-scale temporal and spatial variation in insect body size Michelle Tseng, University of British Columbia
Katrina Kaur, UBC; Sina Soleimani Pari, UBC; Karnjit Sarai, UBC; Denessa Chan, UBC; Christine Yao, UBC; Paula Porto, UBC; Anmol Toor, UBC; Harpawantaj Toor, UBC; Katrina Fograsher, UBC
Concurrent IV-C - Room 290, Hearst Memorial Mining Building - 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Moderator/timekeeper: Anna Monfils

Theme: Biodiversity data archives for education and science outreach
1:30-1:45 60-minute discussion: Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education: An open discussion of current efforts to define biodiversity literacy skills for the core undergraduate biology curriculum Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University
Natalie Douglas, Central Michigan University; Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits; Debra Linton, Central Michigan University; Molly Phillips, iDigBio; Lisa White, University of California Museum of Paleontology
1:45-2:00 Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education, cont'd Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University
Natalie Douglas, Central Michigan University; Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits; Debra Linton, Central Michigan University; Molly Phillips, iDigBio; Lisa White, University of California Museum of Paleontology
2:00-2:15 Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education, cont'd Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University
Natalie Douglas, Central Michigan University; Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits; Debra Linton, Central Michigan University; Molly Phillips, iDigBio; Lisa White, University of California Museum of Paleontology
2:15-2:30 Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education, cont'd Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University
Natalie Douglas, Central Michigan University; Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits; Debra Linton, Central Michigan University; Molly Phillips, iDigBio; Lisa White, University of California Museum of Paleontology
2:30-2:45 Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education, cont'd Anna Monfils, Central Michigan University
Natalie Douglas, Central Michigan University; Elizabeth Ellwood, La Brea Tar Pits; Debra Linton, Central Michigan University; Molly Phillips, iDigBio; Lisa White, University of California Museum of Paleontology
Concurrent IV-D - Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center - 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Moderator: Carol Spencer
Timekeeper: Carla Cicero

Theme: Meeting the research challenges of the Anthropocene
1:30-1:45 Linking museum specimens with physiological ecology to model susceptibility to climate change in desert bird communities Eric Riddell, UC Berkeley
Kelly Iknayan, UC Berkeley; Blair Wolf, University of New Mexico; Barry Sinervo, UC Santa Cruz; Steve Beissinger, UC Berkeley
1:45-2:00 Growing Up Digital: MorphoSource as a Case Study for Scaling a Digital Repository Julie Winchester, Duke University
Doug M. Boyer, Duke University; Tim McGeary, Duke University; Tim Ryan, Pennsylvania State University
2:00-2:15 Integrating digital datasets to quantify morphological variability and understand species delimitation: an innovative approach using terebratulide brachiopods Natalia Lopez Carranza, University of California, Davis
Sandra J. Carlson, University of California Davis
2:15-2:30 45-minute discussion: Using CT data in biodiversity research David C. Blackburn, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Michelle Koo, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley; Edward Stanley, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
2:30-2:45 CT Data, cont'd David C. Blackburn, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Michelle Koo, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley; Edward Stanley, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
2:45-3:00 CT Data, cont'd David C. Blackburn, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Michelle Koo, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley; Edward Stanley, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
3:00-3:30 Break - Garbarini Lounge, Bechtel Engineering Center
Capstone Session
Moderator: Gil Nelson
3:30-4:00 Monitoring Biodiversity from Space Cindy Schmidt, Associate Program Manager, Applied Sciences Ecoforecasting Program, ARSET Land Management team lead, Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, NASA Ames Research Center
4:00-4:30 Biodiversity Data and an Evolving Funding Landscape Dena Smith, Program Director, Division of Earth Sciences, Sedimentary Geology & Paleobiology Program, U.S. National Science Foundation
5:00 - 7:00 p.m. - Tours - Berkeley Museums of Natural History; Reception: Second Floor Courtyard, Valley Life Sciences Building

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

Day Three - Workshops
Breakfast (On your own) 7:00 - 8:00 a.m.
Registration 7:00 - 8:15 a.m.
Collections tours at California Academy of Sciences
1:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Capacity limited to 20 participants

Cal Academy is offering space for 20 people to do tours in two groups of 10 each. Included are tours of two scientific collections plus an aquarium tour for each group. The tours will take about 2 hours, after which participants will be invited to explore the public floor including catching a planetarium show. First come, first served.

Group 1 (10 people):

   1:30 - Botany for 30 minutes
   2:00 - Anthropology for 30 minutes
   2:30 - Aquarium tour for 1 hour
   3:30 - Free time
   4:30 - Planetarium Show
   5:00 - Public Floor closes

Group 2: (10 people):

   1:30 - Aquarium tour for 1 hour
   2:30 - Entomology for 30 minutes
   3:00 - Ichthyology / Herpetology for 30 minutes
   3:30 - Free time
   4:30 - Planetarium Show
   5:00 - Public Floor closes
Field Trip - Pt. Reyes National Seashore
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Cost: $25.00
Capacity limited to 16 participants

Join us on a field trip to Point Reyes National Seashore, over 100 square miles of unique coastal wilderness and open space that hosts an estimated 2.5 million visitors every year. The tour will include a visit to UC Berkeley’s Point Reyes Field Station, which is located within park boundaries in bucolic Olema Valley and facilitates science education and research in the park. Participants will also attend a presentation of NOAA’s Science on a Sphere and its real-time earth sciences data at the park’s visitor center, purchase lunch to go at a nearby deli (or bring your own), learn about decades of fire ecology research after a fire swept through the park’s coastal plant communities in 1995, have a chance to see resident Tule elk, and explore one of the most scenic beaches in the park. Photograph shorebirds, stroll along the sand, and dip a toe in the chilly Pacific Ocean before heading back to Berkeley.
Approximate itinerary:
8 am pick up vans from Enterprise
8:30 am depart campus
9:45 am arrive at PRFS for ~30 minute tour
10:15 am depart PRFS
10:30 am arrive at Inverness Market for people to purchase lunches to go
11 am depart Inverness Market
11:15 am arrive at Bear Valley Visitor Center (walk around exhibits, visit shop, use restrooms)
11:30 am Science on a Sphere presentation in Bear Valley Visitor Center theater hosted by Ben Becker (about 30 minutes long)
12-1 pm lunch in picnic area near Bear Valley Visitor Center
1pm depart Bear Valley Visitor Center for drive to Limantour Beach
1:20 pm stop for short walk and fire ecology show and tell (stay about 45 minutes)
2 pm depart for Limantour Beach (stay about 1 hour)
3 pm depart for UC Berkeley
4:30-5 pm arrive at UC Berkeley

Self-guided tour of the UC Botanical Garden

The 34-acre UC Botanical Garden is one of the most diverse landscapes in the world, with over 10,000 types of plants including many rare and endangered species. Organized geographically, the Garden features 9 regions of naturalistic plantings from Italy to South Africa, along with a major collection of California native plants. The Garden was established in 1890 and its living collections are invaluable resources for international research and conservation.

The Botanical Garden has free admission on Wednesday June 6th. The shuttle stop is next to the conference location, costs $1 for a short 10 minute ride up to the gardens. We encourage you to visit while you're in town.

Workshop 1 - Bechtel Engineering Center, Room 240 - 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Moderator: Andy Bentley, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute

Theme: BCoN: Data integration and attribution
This workshop will expand on the BCoN February needs assessment workshop and will focus on finding mechanisms to facilitate the integration of data and attribution of collections within the data pipeline. All conference attendees are welcomed to attend. A white paper from the February workshop will be used to highlight areas of need, topics of discussion, further development, and to discuss specific ways in which we can bridge the existing gaps and provide the necessary mechanisms to create robust integration and attribution pathways for collections data.
Workshop 2 - Hearst Memorial Mining Building, Room 290 - 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Moderators: Hamish Holewa, Robina Sanderson, John La Salle, CSIRO, Canberra, Australia

Theme: Next generation biodiversity data: developing an international traits system
Biodiversity “trait data” refers to a variety of species or specimen level attributes that can contribute to our understanding, assessment, conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity data (e.g. morphology, species interactions, derived genomic information, life history/stage/behaviour, ecological attributes and tolerances, medicinal or food uses, etc.). There are several initiatives around the world that are starting to make computable trait data available to the biodiversity research community. There is now an opportunity to work together to create an international traits system that will facilitate the sharing, integration and use of this data, and bringing it into eResearch infrastructures to fully integrate it with other data streams, environmental layers, phylogenetic tools and mapping and analysis capability. This workshop is the start of developing a coordinated international effort to meet this vision.
[Invited] Workshop 3 - Bechtel Engineering Center, Room 240 - 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Moderator: Alex Vandam, University of Puerto Rico

Theme: Sharing and Mobilization of Massive Specimen Image Databases from Collections of Tropical Island Biodiversity
Tropical Islands are global biodiversity hotspots, this combined with their remote locations has led to many undescribed species on tropical islands. In order to further our taxonomic knowledge of tropical island biodiversity rapid dissemination of expertly identified specimens is needed. Here we start with tropical islands that we have strong holdings of in our collections, and discuss which geographic regions should have highest priority for digitization. We will discuss new methods for capturing specimen images and sharing massive databases of specimen image files. We will also discuss how to best mobilize these specimens from our collections in the most efficient manner.
[Invited] Workshop 4 - UCMP Fishbowl, Valley Life Sciences Building - 8:30 a.m. - Noon
Moderator: Dave Blackburn, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Theme: Meeting of oVert collaborators

This meeting will afford the opportunity for oVert collaborators to review progress, discuss issues and solutions, share workflows, and troubleshoot image uploads and management.

Unconference event - VLSB 2063, Valley Life Sciences Building - 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Moderators: Carl Boettiger, University of California, Berkeley; Matt Collins, iDigBio, University of Florida; Deb Paul, iDigBio, Florida State University

Theme: The Digital Data un-un-conference: Leveraging Data Science for Digital Biodiversity.

Now that you’ve seen two full days of wonderful talks, come join your fellow attendees to discuss your reactions. Pitch your new research ideas, or just come to hear how others see the biodiversity and data science domains moving forward together. There will be a public session to introduce project ideas followed by an opportunity to self-organize into focused groups to prepare a plan for tackling them. Learn about new domains and share your expertise in your field, while exploring ideas inspired by the main conference. Products: Written project plans w/ collaborators and plan for the next 6 months
Workshop 5 - Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center - 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Moderator: Dave Thau, Manager of Developer Relations for Google Earth Engine and Google Earth Outreach
Theme: Hands-on training on Google's planetary-scale geospatial and imagery analysis tools

NOTE: All participants for this workshop should sign up for Google's Earth Engine prior to the workshop.

At Google we've been busily creating geospatial and imagery analysis tools that are being used in forest conservation, water monitoring, malaria elimination, camera trap species recognition and a host of other applications. This workshop will provide hands-on training on some of these tools, including Google Earth Engine and machine learning tools, with an eye toward their application to biodiversity data management and analysis. There will also be plenty of time to discuss where these tools can be improved, and to brainstorm around future projects where they might be leveraged. If this sounds good to you, sign up for Earth Engine and we'll see you there.